Posted tagged ‘rescue pets.’

When It Doesn’t Work Out

June 27, 2017

Last month I wrote about the need to give a rescue pet a fair chance at learning to live in your home. This time I want to talk about the other side of the coin, what happens when, for whatever reason, you find you are not able to keep your rescue. As much as we think it’s unfair to the pet to have to give up on him, sometimes it really is the best choice.

Some years ago (well, more than just some) I trial-adopted a six month old puppy that had a number of issues working against her. To begin with, she was born to a stray that had been living on her own for a long time, and whose puppies had experienced no human contact until the little family was rescued from the woods. This puppy had one eye that was deformed, and she was also deaf. While she had no aggressive tendencies, she was very frightened (understandably so) and spooked at every little movement. For the short time we had her, she rarely came out from behind the furniture, and then only after much coaxing, to eat or for us to take her outside. In that time, she didn’t learn to trust us at all.

When I agreed to take the puppy, I truly thought we could overcome her problems. To be perfectly honest, we could not. Perhaps had I consulted a dog trainer we might have been able to work with her, but at the time I didn’t feel I had the skills or the ability to deal with the puppy’s issues. After much consideration, I finally returned her to the person who had rescued her in the first place. I’d never done that before, and I cried all the way home. I blamed myself for giving up and worried about what would happen to her, although the rescuer assured me she would keep the puppy herself. Still, I felt guilty but also relieved, because the concern over how to deal with all the problems had caused a lot of stress in the family. Then I felt guilty for feeling relieved!

The point I’m trying to make is that sometimes this happens. Sometimes we find the pet we have brought home with such hope for giving it a new life just does not fit, does not adjust, and there is stress in the house that is certainly not conducive to a happy home for anybody. Sometimes we have to admit we made a mistake. My advice in such a situation is to recognize the problem and find a solution before letting it go on too long. It is better to admit defeat than to accept the stress and allow the pet to remain unhappy, too.

If you adopted from a shelter or rescue group, you probably signed a contract/agreement to return the pet if you weren’t able to keep it. Honor that agreement. If you bought from a breeder, you should contact them and ask their policy. Some breeders will take back a pet bought from them. For tips on how to handle the situation, you might check out this link: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/pets/dog-care/rehoming-what-to-do-if-you-cant-keep-your-dog . I confess this many years later that I still feel some regret and guilt for giving up on the puppy, but it truly was the best answer for her and me and the family.

On a lighter note, congratulations to the Humane Society of Southwestern Michigan on breaking ground for their new shelter. While construction will soon be underway, the capital campaign continues. For all details, please visit their website: www.humanesocietyswm.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve all heard that rescue pets are the best. That when given a second (or third or fourth) chance at having a forever home, an animal will be so grateful they will shower you with their conditional love. While that may very well be true, what you don’t often hear about are the many challenges that can go along with adopting a pet second (or third or fourth) hand. After we adopted Ace the tenacious terrier, we realized this was only the second time we had brought a dog home that we had not gotten as a small puppy. Even though we’d adopted rescues before, they were very young and had not already been imprinted with another person’s living habits. While at a little over a year old Ace was still a puppy at heart, he had lived somewhere else, in another home, with another family. He was eager to please and just wanted to be loved, but he didn’t have a clue what was expected of him. Nor did we know what he had experienced in his former home. Unlike a younger puppy, he wasn’t a blank slate that we could write only our expectations on. He was house-trained and only had a few initial accidents inside, which was a big plus, and he was used to staying in his crate (maybe too much); but we quickly learned there were things he feared and things he’d not been exposed to (like the outside world). Walking on a leash was new, as was staying outside his crate when we were not home. The past few months have been a process, but he is a smart little guy and he’s learning. He’s also found a place in the hearts of his new family. So if you are thinking of adopting a rescue pet, please be aware there may be a learning curve, and don’t let your expectations rush the adjustment that may take a little or a lot of time. Realize your new friend has had a previous life that was probably very different from the one you are offering, and don’t be in a hurry to give up. Remember this is “kitten season,” when many litters come into shelters or are taken in by rescue groups. Donations of kitten food and litter are always most appreciated, but of course the best way to help the situation is to spay and neuter our own cats. They are capable of reproducing at a very young age, so if you have recently adopted a kitten, contact your veterinarian about the best time to have this done. It is truly a gift to your pet

May 23, 2017

Ace

The Newcomer

March 19, 2017

His name is Ace and he’s a little over a year old. He’s full of puppy energy and terrier mischief, and now he lives at our house! He came to us from Seven Star Sanctuary and Rescue,  and in just a short time he has become a member of the family. There was a little period of adjustment, as Foo Foo the Pomeranian and the cats Zombie and Sandwich learned to accept the newcomer, but now they are all friends and get along quite well. Sometimes there is a little craziness, as when cats decide to tease and lead Ace on a merry chase around the house. Then mom and dad have to get involved because he hasn’t quite learned how to control himself yet and ends up sitting on a cat. Sometimes there is yelping, when a cat has had enough and puts out a claw, but for the most part it’s all fun and games.
Ace looks forward to walks around the neighborhood and playing in his big backyard. He wasn’t too fond of the snow, but he loves to chase a tennis ball, though he hasn’t yet figured out he’s supposed to bring it back. He also enjoys chewing things, so we try to keep his rawhide bones and toys handy to discourage him from turning to less desirable targets. He’s learning little by little and we just need to have patience. Since we don’t know anything about his background, it’s hard to know what was expected of him in his early months…or not expected. He’s still a bit leery of other dogs, but he’s eager to learn how to fit into his new household.

 

All in all, he’s a good boy who just wants to be loved, as do all pets, and we’re glad he found his way to us. If you’re looking to add a new pet to your family, please remember to check out local rescues and shelters where many more pets are waiting for their forever homes.

Welcome to the Zeke Chronicles!

May 18, 2012

Hi and thanks for stopping by. This is my new blog and this is my dog Zeke. He’s an almost 10 year old Jack Russell Terrier (some people call them Parson Russell but I think Jack fits much better). We’ve had Zeke since he was just a little fella (about 10 weeks old) and even though I’ve owned dogs all my life, I have to confess that being owned by a Jack Russell was a whole new experience for my family and me. They are truly unique little dogs. I could go on and on about that, but the reason I started this blog was to tie it in with a little column I write called the Pet Corner. It’s appears once a month in Mailmax, a small weekly paper that’s published in my area. The Pet Corner is dedicated to helping pet owners live better lives with their furry kids; but most of all The Pet Corner tries to help whenever possible to draw attention to the many pets living in shelters who would like nothing better than to find forever homes. I try to make readers aware of activities in the area that help support our local humane society and several rescue groups, but sometimes it’s just fun stuff about everyday life with pets. And sometimes Zeke himself takes over and writes a column! (I did mention what a unique little dog he is, didn’t I?) So I hope you’ll stop by often and see what’s happening. I plan to post more pictures of our pets who also include Foofoo, the crazy Pomeranian, and Spidercat, who was once upon a time a skinny shelter cat. I’ll also post some of my older, most favorite Pet Corner columns here. If you love pets, this is the place for you. Hope to “see” you again here soon.