Posted tagged ‘Spay/neuter pets’

An Ounce of Prevention

May 1, 2017

 

 

So often we hear of or read in the news of the tragic consequences of a dog bite or attack. Courtesy of the Humane Society of the United States, here are three basic tips on how to prevent the trauma of a dog bite from happening.

Spay or neuter your dog. A dog that is altered is less likely to bite. That is not to say they will never bite given the right circumstances, but they are less apt to show aggression.

Socialize your dog. Expose your dog to different people and animals and situations so he doesn’t become frightened or nervous when around them.

Train your dog. Obedience classes can help socialize and teach techniques for helping your dog learn proper behavior.

The website www.humanesociety.org offers a number of other tips for dog bite prevention. Never encourage or allow your dog to chase after or attack other animals, even if in fun. Dogs often don’t understand the difference between play and real life. The first time a dog shows dangerous behavior is the time to consult a professional. Don’t wait till an accident happens. Aggressive behavior toward other animals can be a precursor to the same toward people. License and vaccinate your dog. Don’t allow your dog to roam alone. Dogs on their own are more apt to attack. Avoid stressful situations if your dog can’t handle them and work with a trainer to help overcome inappropriate behavior. If you must give up a dog because of dangerous behavior that you cannot control, please consult your veterinarian, humane society, or animal control for advice.

There are also things we can do to make ourselves less vulnerable to a dog attack. Don’t attempt to pet a strange dog without asking the owner first and teach children to do the same. Don’t disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating, has a chew toy or a female dog with puppies. Watch a dog’s body language and learn to interpret the signs of an imminent attack. A tense body, stiff tail, eyes rolled to show the whites, yawning, intense stare, backing away, and licking lips are all signs a dog is stressed and may attack. If this happens, never turn your back and run as the natural instinct is to chase. Avoid eye contact and keep hands at your sides and remain still. If the dog loses interest, back away slowly until out of sight.

If attacked, put anything between you and the dog, jacket, purse, whatever you might have on you. If you fall or are knocked down, curl into a ball and cover your ears with your hands. Try to remain still. If bitten, try to remain calm. Wash the wound as soon as possible with soap and warm water. Contact medical help and report the bite to local law enforcement and animal control. Give them as much information about the dog as you can, including description, name of dog’s owner (if known), or if the dog is a stray, which way it went.

Always be vigilant with children around dogs, even if they are family pets. Puppies will put up with a lot more than adult dogs, and at around age two a dog begins to object to ear and tail-pulling, being hugged and sat on. Children need to be taught appropriate behavior around dogs and that any kind of teasing or tormenting is not acceptable. Children should also realize that not all dogs respond to gestures of affection the same as their own pet. A dog tied up and left alone in a busy place is never a good idea. If approached by a stranger they poiabout a dog attack that had tragic results both for the child and the dog involved, but was totally preventable. You can also download a Dog Decoder app for your phone that gives very good information on how to interpret a dog’s body language and avoid an attack. In the case of dog bites, an ounce of prevention is usually worth ten pounds of cure.

 

 

Bunnies, Chicks, and Ducklings, Oh My!

March 21, 2016

They’re cute, fuzzy, and look like they would be very cuddly, something any child would like to find in an Easter basket. But unless one is prepared to house, feed, and properly care for them for the duration of their lives, baby ducks and chicks are really not meant to be bought for pets. They have very specific needs, and it can quickly become quite a chore for most of us to meet them. Baby bunnies are also cute and cuddly and can make excellent pets, even to being litter box trained, but again, their needs are different. For anyone choosing to buy one as a pet, please be aware of the care they require and make a commitment to keep them beyond their cute bunny stage when they become rabbits. Many shelters do take in unwanted bunnies after the cuteness has worn off, so if you really want one for a pet you might check with them to see if any are available for adoption.

The Humane Society of Southwestern Michigan has two fundraisers coming up this spring. On April 11th, they will hold a Share Night at Culver’s in Stevensville. From 5:00 to 8:00 pm, the shelter will receive a percentage of total store sales. It’s an easy way to help out the shelter and enjoy a nice dinner out with the family.

The 8th Annual Bids for Barks is set for Saturday, May 14th, at the Kickers Club, 2601 Hetler Dr., St. Joseph. All tickets are reserved at $45.00 and may be ordered at their website, www.humanesocietyswm.org. Or you may call Lynn at 269-921-6743. Tickets include dinner. There will be a silent as well as a live auction and entertainment and cash bar. Tables for 8 may be reserved for $350.00. Doors open at 5pm. Proceeds from the auction will help fund the Capital Campaign Fund. If you are unable to attend but would like to make a donation to the fund, you can go to their website and click on Capital Campaign. You may also view the plans for the new larger and more modern shelter that will replace the current one built in 1964.

These are some immediate needs the humane society shelter has this month: puppy food, both canned and dry, copy paper, laundry detergent and non-pine scented floor cleaner. As we will soon be headed into “kitten season,” I’m sure they would also appreciate kitten and cat food as well as non-clumping litter. While most shelters are full to brimming with cats all the time, spring and early summer always see0 a big influx of kittens into shelters everywhere. We know how quickly cats can and do reproduce, so if you have recently adopted a young kitten, please know how soon they mature. Female cats can have kittens as young as six months old, so check with your vet about when to have her spayed. Neutering your male cat is a win-win for you, the cat and the neighborhood. Please do your part to not add to the cat overpopulation. Spay and neuter your pets!